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Antique Diamond Cuts

Diamond cutters in past centuries used techniques that are no longer common today. Often cutting diamonds by hand, they gave diamonds shapes and dimensions that capture the character and essence of their eras. Diamonds cut using the old techniques may exhibit less fire and brilliance, though they sometimes are preferred for their warmer, more romantic glow. In recent times, antique diamond cuts have enjoyed a renewed popularity. Diamonds cut using the old techniques are becoming increasingly sought after and desirable.

Below please find descriptions of the antique diamond cuts that may be found in our collection.

Antique Diamonds Cuts

Single Cut

A single cut diamond has a large table and an octagonal girdle. The culet, or bottom edge of the diamond, may be pointed or it may be flat. A single cut diamond usually has 18 facets. The single cut is an extremely old diamond cut dating to the 1300s.

Rose Cut

The rose cut features a flat bottom with a dome-shaped crown, rising to a single apex. With anywhere from 3 to 24 facets, a rose cut diamond resembles the shape of a rose bud. The rose cut dates to the 1500s and remained common during the Georgian and Victorian eras.

Antique diamonds capture the character and essence of their era.

Old Mine Cut

Diamonds with this cut possess a squarish girdle with gently rounded corners. Old mine cut diamonds have a high crown, a small table, and a large, flat culet. They are similar to today’s cushion cut. The old mine cut dates to the 1700s and was most prevalent during the Georgian and Victorian eras.

Old European Cut

Like the old mine cut, diamonds cut into this shape possess a high crown, small table, and a large, flat culet. However, the old European cut has a circular girdle. With 58 facets, it is the predecessor of today’s modern round brilliant cut. The Old European cut dates to the 1800s and was used mostly during the Victorian, Edwardian, and Art Nouveau eras.

Modern Round Brilliant Cut

In the early 1900s, diamond cutters began to experiment with new techniques. A breakthrough came in 1919 with the introduction of the round brilliant cut. Due to its ability to maximize fire and brilliance, the round brilliant cut has become the standard and most popular way to cut diamonds. Like the old European cut, a round brilliant cut diamond has a circular girdle and 58 facets. However, the round brilliant cut lacks a culet. The round brilliant cut became prevalent during the Art Deco and Retro periods.

Visit our antique ring gallery. Recycled jewelry from past eras offers an ethical and unique alternative for jewelry and engagement rings.

 

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